Beach Positional Words Packet

I’m always looking for new pictures to target positional concepts.

Here are 30 pages of activities to teach positional concepts with a beach theme! The activities in this packet target the following 6 positional concepts: in front, behind, between, beside, under/below, over/above. Here’s a detailed look at what is included the packet:

Pages 2-17: Positional Concepts Flashcards- There are 4 color flashcards on each page, so you get a total of 64 flash cards! Each flashcard shows one of the target positional concepts (in front, behind, between, beside, under/below, over/above) using 2 different beach objects. The flashcards do not have the target positional word written on them in case you are using them with students that are able to read.

beach_1_001beach_2_001

 

Pages 18- 21: Beach Kids Following Directions Activities- There is a mat with a picture of 2 kids at the beach as well as pictures of 24 different beach objects. You can have students follow directions such as “put the shell above the boy” or “put the crab beside the girl.” There are suggested prompts for 1-step and 2-step directions.

beach_3_001 beach_4

 

Pages 22-31: Positional Concepts Homework Pages- There are 10 different homework pages with black and white graphics so they are easy to just print off and send home.

  • There are four pages that show 2 pictures and ask a question such as “Which shovel is in front of the pail?” or “Which dolphin is beside the treasure chest?” There are 4 questions per page.

beach_5

  • There are four pages that show 1 picture and ask students to use positional words to describe the location of an object. For example, “Where is the fish?” or “Where is the sea horse.” There are 6 questions per page.

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  • There are 2 pages that show 1 picture and ask students to choose the correct positional word. For example, “Is the shovel over or under the shell?” or “Is the crab in front or behind the beach ball?” There are 6 questions per page.

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All graphics from www.mycutegraphics.com and www.scrappindoodles.com

You can purchase this packet from my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Beach-Themed-Positional-Concepts-Cards-749267

/k/ and /g/ articulation folders

I’ve created some more articulation folders for /k/ and /g/.  You can see how to assemble the folders at my post here: https://expresslyspeaking.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/articulation-folders/

/k/ is called the “tongue-back coughing quiet sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /k/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /k/ are the following:

Tongue-Back– the picture shows the tongue pushed back as it is when producing /k/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue in a mirror.

Coughing– A picture of coughing was chosen to help represent /k/ because coughing is a short sound produced in the back of your throat. Many kids are able to imitate coughing before they are able to imitate /k/ correctly, so you can talk about how a cough comes from the back of your throat. You can also have kids look in a mirror as they make a coughing sound to see that the tip of their tongue is down.

Quiet– a picture of a child making the gesture for “shhhh” is used to represent the unvoiced quality of /k/. This picture can also encourage discussion about non-verbal communication if children are unfamiliar with this gesture.

k_artic_folder

 

/g/ is called the “tongue-back coughing noisy sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /g/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /g/ are the following:

Tongue-Back– the picture shows the tongue pushed back as it is when producing /g/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue in a mirror.

Coughing– A picture of coughing was chosen to help represent /g/ because coughing is a short sound produced in the back of your throat. Many kids are able to imitate coughing before they are able to imitate /g/ correctly, so you can talk about how a cough comes from the back of your throat. You can also have kids look in a mirror as they make a coughing sound to see that the tip of their tongue is down.

Noisy– a picture of a drum is used to represent the voicing aspect of /g/. A drum was used because children will easily associate it with noise and because the tops of drums vibrate as the vocal folds do. Kids can feel a drum vibrate and feel their own larynx to help them understand this.

g_artic_folder

 

The clipart is from http://www.mycutegraphics.com and http://www.scrappindoodles.com

You can download the /k/ folder at my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/k-Articulation-Folder-749158

Or the /g/ artic folder here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/g-Articulation-Folder-749161

Mrs. Wishy-Washy’s Farm Book Companion

I do a farm theme with my students every year and I always include Mrs. Wishy-Washy’s Farm by Joy Cowley and Elizabeth Fuller is great book to include in your farm theme. The book is about a trio of farm animals that run away to the city because they are tired of taking baths. The text rhymes and is appropriate for preschoolers and kindergartners. The illustrations are adorable and add to the humor of the book. You can buy this book on amazon for under $6.00 or I have also seen it in the scholastic book orders for preschoolers.

I have created a 51 page packet of activities to go along with Mrs. Wishy-Washy’s Farm. Some of the activities in this packet are directly related to the book and some could be used with any farm theme.

Pages 2-5: Comprehension Questions– 16 comprehension question cards with 3 pictures for answer choices.

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Pages 6-8: Yes/No Questions about the story– 18 different comprehension questions with yes/no answers.

washy_2

Pages 9-10: Vocabulary Cards – 12 different vocabulary pictures related to the story.

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Pages 11- 16: Same/Different Worksheets– Students identify which picture is different or which two pictures are the same.     There are 6 different worksheets with farm-themed pictures.

washy_4

Pages 17-18: Clean/Dirty Concept Cards- There are 8 different cards that help teach the concepts of “clean” and “dirty.”

washy_6

Pages 19-23: Farm Animal Attributes– There are 18 different cards with attributes and 12 different farm animals. You can use the attribute mat on page 23 by putting one of the attribute cards in the small box at the top and then having your students put the appropriate farm animals in the large box at the bottom of the page.

washy_7

Page 24: Open-ended Farm Game Board– You can use this game board as a reinforcer during a variety of different activities.

Pages 25-27: Dot Worksheets- You can use these 3 dot worksheets as a reinforcer while practicing a variety of different articulation or language skills.

Pages 28-30: Barrier Game– There is a farm scene and 10 different farm animals that can be placed on the scene. You can use this like a traditional barrier game or to practice following directions that contain prepositions.

washy_8

Pages 31-33: Preposition Concept Cards: There are 18 different cards that target the positional concepts “over,” “under,” “beside,” “in front,” “behind,” “between.” You will get 3 different farm-themed pictures for each of the concepts listed. You can have your students describe where the animal is in the picture or have your students sort the cards by preposition. For example, have your students match all the animals that are “over” an object or all the animals that are “under” an object.

washy_9

Pages 34- 37: Plural-s Practice– Have your students make sentences using the sentence strips “I have _____ ______ on my farm” or “I washed _____ _____.” Students can complete the sentences using the numbers “1” or “2” plus a corresponding picture of farm animals. For example, “I washed 2 pigs” or “I washed 1 cow.” There are 22 different animal pictures to be used to complete these sentences.

Pages 38- 48: Open-Ended Bath Game– Give each of your students a mat with pictures of 8 things that they would need in the bath (pages 38-42). Cut apart the picture cards on pages 43-48, turn them upside-down, and mix up the cards. Have your students choose a card and then perform their target skill the number of times that is indicated on the card. The student can then match that card to the corresponding picture on his/her mat. The winner is the first student to collect cards for all 8 items on his/her mat. There are also foil cards that require students to put 1 or 2 cards back.

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Pages 49-51: Rhyming Words Matching Game– There are 12 different pairs of rhyming words from the text of the story on barn cards. You can cut apart the cards and play a memory game to have your students match the rhyming words.

washy_11

Graphics from www.mycutegraphics.com and www.scrappindoodles.com

You can purchase this book companion at my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Mrs-Wishy-Washys-Farm-Book-Companion-742180

Please note that the book is NOT included in the download.

My Favorite Games to use with AAC Users

I think it can be difficult to help AAC users move from using single words to using sentences that more completely express their ideas. Playing games can be a great and motivating way to practice making sentences on an AAC device.  These games can be played using core vocabulary pages or you can create a page with words/phrases specifically for the game. I will often use core vocabulary for kids that can direct select the icons by touching them and create pages for kids that use scanning with switches to select the icon. It’s a lot more efficient for kids that use switches if they don’t have to navigate between multiple pages every time they take a turn.

 

Here are some of my favorite games for AAC devices:

 

1)   I-Spy: Choose something around the room and make the sentence “I spy something that is ____________.” I make kids give me a second clue if I don’t guess what they spy after 2-3 tries so that they get more practice constructing sentences.

2)   Guess Who- This game is a great way to practice asking questions. Have your students make a sentence like “Does your person have ________?” or “Is your person _________?

3)   Go Fish- Here is another great game for asking questions. Your students can construct questions like “Do you have a ____________?” and statements like “No, go fish” or “I got a match.” You can practice locating different icons on the AAC device if you use cards with pictures of animals, vehicles, or foods to play.

4)   20 Questions- First, think of an item and tell your student if it is a person, place, or thing. Then have your student construct questions about the mystery object.  Answer questions until your student can guess what you were thinking of. Then let your student think of something and answer your questions. If it’s difficult for your student to think of his/her own object or to guess yours without a little guidance, you can put out some pictures and choose your objects from them.

5)   Scattergories- This game isn’t necessarily the best for making sentences, but it’s great for vocabulary. Your student will have to locate items on his/her AAC device to fit the different categories.

6)   Catch Phrase- In this game, you have to describe a word to the other player so that they can guess what you are describing. Your students can construct sentences to give you clues. This is a motivating game to work on constructing sentences because single words probably won’t give enough information for the other person to guess the object. You can set a timer and see how many words you can guess in a certain amount of time (I usually use like 5 min with AAC users)

7)   Taboo- This game is similar to Catch Phrase. Each player chooses a card and has to give clues to describe the word at the top of the card. Under the word that you are supposed to describe, it lists a few words that you aren’t allowed to say in your clues.

8)   Tell Tale- In this game, you choose several pictures and use the pictures together to make up a story. You can make a story together by having one player make up the first sentence of your story and the second player add the next sentence. Then you can alternate back and forth with sentences. I think this is a good way to play the game for AAC users that need extra time to make sentences because it gives them a little break between each turn to formulate their thoughts.

9)   Rory’s Story Cubes- This game is similar to Tell Tale. You roll dice and then make a story using the pictures on the dice. This game also comes in different themes like “actions” and “voyages.”

10)   You’ve Been Sentenced- This game is best for more advanced AAC users that are working on grammar endings and sentence structure. You choose cards and make the longest, grammatically correct sentence that you can.

 

What other games do you play with your AAC users?

Summer “what” and “where” questions Freebie!

Here’s my most recent freebie! Everyone seemed to like my Spring “wh” question cards, so  I made some similar cards for Summer.

Included in this download  are 30 “wh” questions about summer and the beach! This download includes 15 “what” questions and 15 “where” questions.  The question cards have a blue border and the answer cards have a yellow border. I included pictures on the answer cards so that you can more easily prompt your students or offer choices. These questions are great for working on summer vocabulary and understanding different types of questions.

summer_wh_questions

You can download these cards for free at my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Summer-what-and-where-questions-725856

Hopefully you will be able to use these cards either during summer school or when school starts again in August! Enjoy!

Graphics from www.mycutegraphics.com and http://www.scrappindoodles.com

Articulation folders for /t/, /d/, and /n/

Here are some more articulation folders! To see a more detailed look at how to use these folders in therapy, you can look at this blog entry: https://expresslyspeaking.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/articulation-folders/

/n/ is called the “tongue-tip humming noisy sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /n/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /n/ are the following:

Tongue-Tip– The picture shows the tongue-tip up behind the front teeth (on the alveolar ridge) as it is when producing /n/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue position in a mirror.

Humming– A picture of a microphone was chosen to represent the nasal aspect of /n/ because many children are familiar with microphones and enjoy using them to sing and produce sounds. /n/ is called a “humming” sound because you must force air out the nose, which is similar to humming. In addition, it helps children see the similarities between /n/ and /m/ because /m/ is also called a “humming” sound.

Noisy– a picture of a drum is used to represent the voicing aspect of /n/. A drum was used because children will easily associate it with noise and because the tops of drums vibrate as the vocal folds do. Kids can feel a drum vibrate and feel their own larynx to help them understand this.

n_artic_folder

/d/ is called the “tongue-tip tapping noisy sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /d/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /d/ are the following:

Tongue-Tip– The picture shows the tongue-tip up behind the front teeth (on the alveolar ridge) as it is when producing /d/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue position in a mirror.

Tapping– A picture of a hammer was chosen to represent the “tapping” aspect of /d/. Most children and familiar with hammers and you can have children practice tapping a toy hammer on nails to demonstrate the short, tapping movement for /d/. You can discuss how tapping the tip of the tongue on your teeth is similar to a hammer tapping on a nail.

Noisy– a picture of a drum is used to represent the voicing aspect of /d/. A drum was used because children will easily associate it with noise and because the tops of drums vibrate as the vocal folds do. Kids can feel a drum vibrate and feel their own larynx to help them understand this.

d_articulation_folder

/t/ is called the “tongue-tip tapping quiet sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /t/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /t/ are the following:

Tongue-Tip– The picture shows the tongue-tip up behind the front teeth (on the alveolar ridge) as it is when producing /t/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue position in a mirror.

Tapping– A picture of a hammer was chosen to represent the “tapping” aspect of /t/. Most children and familiar with hammers and you can have children practice tapping a toy hammer on nails to demonstrate the short, tapping movement for /t/. You can discuss how tapping the tip of the tongue on your teeth is similar to a hammer tapping on a nail.

Quiet– a picture of a child making the gesture for “shhhh” is used to represent the unvoiced quality of /t/. This picture can also encourage discussion about non-verbal communication if children are unfamiliar with this gesture.

t_artic_folder

You can download these folders from my TPT store here:  http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Expressly-Speaking/Order:Most-Recently-Posted

How to Use a Dollhouse to Encourage Language Skills

Dollhouses are a great toy for encouraging language skills. Both boys and girls can enjoy playing with a dollhouse. Dollhouses may include a variety of different pieces such as people, chairs, tables, beds, a television, a sink, a toilet, shelves, a stove, and a fridge.

Ideas for beginning social skills:

  • Pretend play skills- Dollhouses are wonderful for practicing pretend play skills! Children can re-enact the activities that they see everyday, such as going to bed or taking a bath. You can also pretend to cook dinner, sit at the table to eat, or watch television. You can model the actions first and then prompt your child to imitate the actions. Use lots of language during play to describe what you are doing!
  • Pointing to make a choice- Hold up two different toys, for example a bed and a chair, and ask your child which one he/she wants to put in the house. You may have to model pointing for your child to imitate or take your child’s hand and help him/her point.  If your child reaches for the book instead of pointing, just say “point to tell me what you want” and move his/her fingers into a pointing position.
  • Joint Attention- Take all of the furniture out of the dollhouse and then give the pieces to your child one at a time. After you give a piece of furniture to your child, point to the spot in the house that you want him/her to put the piece. Your child will have to pay attention to your pointing to learn where he/she needs to put the furniture.

Ideas for receptive language skills:

  • Receptive Vocabulary- Ask your child to identify the household items by having him/her point to the furniture when you name it. For example, you could say, “show me the sink” or “where is the bed?” If your child is having difficulty finding the correct household items, then just set out 2-3 different items for him/her to choose from.
  • Identify household items by attributes- Ask your child to identify different household items when you describe them. You could say “show me something you can sit on” or “show me something that feels soft.”
  • Practice following 1-step directions- You can give your child directions about what to do with different household items. You could say “open the door,” “put the mom in the bed,” or “put the dad under the bed.”
  • Practice following multi-step directions- After your child has mastered following 1-step directions, you can make the directions more difficult by adding steps. You could say “put the mom in the chair and then make her eat” or “put the dad in the bathtub and then wash his hair.”  

Ideas for expressive language skills:

  • Have your child ask for different pieces of furniture:
    • If your child is using sign language, have him/her imitate the sign for the desired household item You could also have your child point to a picture symbol of the desired household item item to request it.
    • If your child is beginning to use words, have him/her imitate the name of the household item that he/she wants.
    • If your child is beginning to use sentences, prompt him/her to say “I want ______” or “put ______ in the house.”
  • Expressive vocabulary- Work on household vocabulary by naming the different furniture items and accessories (table, chair, bed, bathtub, toilet, sink, T.V., door, window, floor, roof, etc.”  You could also work on naming the different body parts on the dolls.
  • Practice using different verbs- Encourage your child to use different action words during play. You can model the action words for your child by describing what you are doing. You could use words like “eat, drink, cook, wash, open, close, climb, sit, sleep, stand, watch, turn on, go, stop, run.”
  • Practice using position words- Have your child tell you where the dolls should go. Encourage your child to use position words such as “in, on, under, behind, in front, and beside.” For example, your child could say, “put the mommy under the table” or “put the daddy behind the shelf.”
  • Practice making a narrative- Have your child tell you a short story about what the dolls might do. Your child could tell a story about playing outside, getting ready in the morning, making dinner or having a birthday party. You can ask your child questions to help add more information to the story. You could ask “What happened next?” or “How did she feel?” or “Then where did he go?” Encourage your child to act out the story with the dolls.

You can download this handout for free at my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/How-to-use-a-dollhouse-to-encourage-language-skills-719836

/v/ articulation folder

Here is my newest articulation folder! For more detailed instructions on how to use my articulation folders, you can look at this post: https://expresslyspeaking.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/articulation-folders/

/v/ is called the “biting blowing noisy sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /v/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /v/ are the following:

Biting– the picture shows the upper teeth biting the lower lip as they are when producing /v/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own lips in a mirror.

Blowing– A picture of bubbles was chosen to represent the blowing nature of /v/. You can talk about /v/ being a long sound and let the child see how long they can blow bubbles without stopping to reinforce the airflow necessary for producing /v/ and to contrast /v/ with stop-plosives.

Noisy– a picture of a drum is used to represent the voicing aspect of /v/. A drum was used because children will easily associate it with noise and because the tops of drums vibrate as the vocal folds do. Kids can feel a drum vibrate and feel their own larynx to help them understand this.

v_folder

You can download this folder from my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/v-articulation-folder-716792

Summer or Beach Themed Following Directions Activity- Freebie!

People seemed to like the Spring following directions boards that I made, so I’ve created some for summer too! These boards are designed to target following directions and summer/beach vocabulary. This file includes 4 different following directions boards, suggested directions for the boards, and 24 vocabulary cards. Here’s a detailed look at what’s in the file:

Page 2- 3: Following directions boards with 11 beach/summer pictures. The same 11 pictures are on both boards, but the pictures are in different positions on the boards.

Beach_1

Page 4: Suggested prompts for the following directions boards on pages 2-3. I included 1 step and 2 step directions.

Pages 5-6: Following directions boards with 11 new beach/summer pictures. Again, the pictures are the same on both boards but they are in different positions.

Beach_2

Page 7: Suggested prompts for the following directions boards on pages 5-6. There are 1-step and 2-step directions.

Pages 8-11: Vocabulary cards for 24 different beach/summer words. You can print 2 copies to play Go Fish or Memory.

Beach_3

 

All graphics are from http://www.scrappindoodles.com and http://www.mycutegraphics.com

You can download these activities for free at my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Summer-or-Beach-Themed-Following-Directions-Activity-712032

 

Articulation Folders

I think that it’s really important to talk to kids about the sounds we are targeting in speech therapy. I like to talk about how to make each sound including which articulators are involved and the features that make that sound distinct. For example, I always call /b/ a “lip popping” sound. This name reminds kids which articulators they are supposed to use (lips) and how they are supposed to move their lips (popping). I’ve created some articulation folders to teach kids about the features of each speech sound and to act as a reinforcer in therapy too. So far, I have created folders for /b, p, m, f/. This summer, I am going to create folders for more sounds.

If you have already purchased any articulation folders from my teachers pay teachers store, I recently sent out an update with new graphics. When I originally made these folders, I was using a different source for all my graphics. I updated them because I wanted the original folders to match the new folders so that they all look like a set.

The /b/ articulation folder is a free download from my TPT store. I am going to use the /b/ folder as an example to show you how to assemble the folders and use them in therapy.

The top section of the folder introduces 3 different characteristics of /b/ using pictures that kids can easily understand. It also gives a very descriptive name for the sound that can be used in therapy to remind children how to produce /b/. Open a file folder and then glue this page with the /b/ descriptors on the top half:

b_folder_1

/b/ is called the “lip popping noisy sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /b/ correctly.

The 3 features for /b/ are the following:

Lip– the picture shows lips pressing together as they are when producing /b/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own lips in a mirror.

Popping– A picture of popcorn was chosen to represent popping because of the noise popcorn makes when it pops. The sound popcorn makes is short, which is an important aspect of the popping nature of /b/. Kids can discuss the short sound and the way their lips feel like they are popping apart.

Noisy– a picture of a drum is used to represent the voicing aspect of /b/. A drum was used because children will easily associate it with noise and because the tops of drums vibrate as the vocal folds do. Kids can feel a drum vibrate and feel their own larynx to help them understand this.

 

Next, glue this page with 10 flowers on the bottom half of the open folder. Laminate the folder and then place a Velcro dot on each flower.

b_folder_2_001

 

Then, cut out all 10 small bees and laminate them. Then, put a Velcro dot on the back of each bee.

b_folder_3_001

 

The bottom half of this folder can be used during practice drills. Kids can produce the target sound in any word position, phrase, or sentence. Then they can attach a bee to a flower each time they produce the target. There are 10 pictures in the game to make data collection easier.

These folders are great for therapists that travel to different buildings because you can have a visual aid for teaching children about the sound and an activity for reinforcement all in one convenient file folder. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

 

You can download these articulation folders at my TPT store here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Expressly-Speaking

Remember, folders for more speech sounds are coming soon!

Graphics from http://www.mycutegraphics.com , photos taken by Lauren Laur