Here are some more articulation folders! To see a more detailed look at how to use these folders in therapy, you can look at this blog entry: https://expresslyspeaking.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/articulation-folders/

/n/ is called the “tongue-tip humming noisy sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /n/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /n/ are the following:

Tongue-Tip– The picture shows the tongue-tip up behind the front teeth (on the alveolar ridge) as it is when producing /n/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue position in a mirror.

Humming– A picture of a microphone was chosen to represent the nasal aspect of /n/ because many children are familiar with microphones and enjoy using them to sing and produce sounds. /n/ is called a “humming” sound because you must force air out the nose, which is similar to humming. In addition, it helps children see the similarities between /n/ and /m/ because /m/ is also called a “humming” sound.

Noisy– a picture of a drum is used to represent the voicing aspect of /n/. A drum was used because children will easily associate it with noise and because the tops of drums vibrate as the vocal folds do. Kids can feel a drum vibrate and feel their own larynx to help them understand this.

n_artic_folder

/d/ is called the “tongue-tip tapping noisy sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /d/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /d/ are the following:

Tongue-Tip– The picture shows the tongue-tip up behind the front teeth (on the alveolar ridge) as it is when producing /d/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue position in a mirror.

Tapping– A picture of a hammer was chosen to represent the “tapping” aspect of /d/. Most children and familiar with hammers and you can have children practice tapping a toy hammer on nails to demonstrate the short, tapping movement for /d/. You can discuss how tapping the tip of the tongue on your teeth is similar to a hammer tapping on a nail.

Noisy– a picture of a drum is used to represent the voicing aspect of /d/. A drum was used because children will easily associate it with noise and because the tops of drums vibrate as the vocal folds do. Kids can feel a drum vibrate and feel their own larynx to help them understand this.

d_articulation_folder

/t/ is called the “tongue-tip tapping quiet sound.” The pictures can be used to stimulate conversation about how it looks, feels, and sounds to produce /t/ correctly. Folders for 2 different sounds can be used together or in a group of children with different target sounds to compare and contrast the features of each.

The 3 features for /t/ are the following:

Tongue-Tip– The picture shows the tongue-tip up behind the front teeth (on the alveolar ridge) as it is when producing /t/.  Kids can compare the picture on the folder to their own tongue position in a mirror.

Tapping– A picture of a hammer was chosen to represent the “tapping” aspect of /t/. Most children and familiar with hammers and you can have children practice tapping a toy hammer on nails to demonstrate the short, tapping movement for /t/. You can discuss how tapping the tip of the tongue on your teeth is similar to a hammer tapping on a nail.

Quiet– a picture of a child making the gesture for “shhhh” is used to represent the unvoiced quality of /t/. This picture can also encourage discussion about non-verbal communication if children are unfamiliar with this gesture.

t_artic_folder

You can download these folders from my TPT store here:  http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Expressly-Speaking/Order:Most-Recently-Posted

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